3 results for tag: AAAS


Reflections: The People Who Make the Data

In 2002, after years of plying my computer-whispering in the for-profit world, I bade farewell to the first-wave dotcom life. A meeting with Patrick Ball had left me convinced that there was something genuinely special about his mission, and I seized the opportunity to join him, Rafe Kaplan, Michelle Dukich, and a handful of others at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). From my very first day it was a heady experience, being swept along by my new colleagues’ contagious fervor. There were late nights, brain-twisting challenges, and no whiteboard in the building was ever large enough to contain the complexity of the ...

Reflections: Richard Savage’s Vision Fulfilled

In 1984, as a fresh PhD, I heard Richard Savage give his presidential address at the Joint Statistical Meetings in Philadelphia. He called it "Hard/Soft Problems" and made a big pitch for statisticians to get involved in human rights data analysis. It was inspirational, and I was immediately sold. I started working with the American Statistical Association's Committee on Scientific Freedom and Human Rights (now chaired by HRDAG's own Megan Price). Over time, a growing set of statisticians became involved, initially in letter-writing campaigns to help dissident statisticians (and other quantitative academics—economists seemed to have a particular ...

Reflections: HRDAG Was Born in Washington

I began working with HRDAG in the summer of 2001 before it was ever even called HRDAG. In fact, not intended as a boast, I think I’m responsible for coming up with the name. After contracting with Dr. Patrick Ball for a time writing the Analyzer data management platform, I left New York City and joined him in Washington, DC, at AAAS in 2002. Soon after starting, Patrick decided to establish an identity for this new team, consisting mainly of myself, Miguel Cruz and a handful of field relationships. We discussed what to name it briefly in the AAAS Science & Policy break room, which at the time, being in the mind of unclever descriptive naming ...