Data on Kosovo Migration

[popup citation=”For migrations: Ball, Patrick. (2000). AAAS/ Human Rights Data Analysis Group database of migrations in Albania and Kosovo. For killings: Patrick Ball, Wendy Betts, Fritz Scheuren, Jana Dudukovich, and Jana Asher. (2002). AAAS/ABA-CEELI/Human Rights Data Analysis Group database of killings in Kosovo. For other data: Human Rights Data Analysis Group. (2002). Database of NATO airstrikes, geographic coding, and KLA activity in Kosovo.”]

The data on migration from Kosovo are in seven files. All of the files are comma-delimited ASCII. The fields in each file are described below. For more information, see Policy or Panic, section A1, pp. 36-37.

If you use these data, please cite them with the following citation, as well as this note:

“These are convenience sample data, and as such they are not a statistically representative sample of events in this conflict.  These data do not support conclusions about patterns, trends, or other substantive comparisons (such as over time, space, ethnicity, age, etc.).”
Ball, Patrick. (2000). AAAS/ Human Rights Data Analysis Group database of migrations in Albania and Kosovo.

Border records

The data keyed from the border records is contained in morina-border.csv. Each of the 19126 records in this file represents a single line in the border records kept by the guards at Morina. The data run from 28 March 1999 until 28 May 1999. Although there were other paper border records, it was impossible to determine the dates on which they had been recorded, and therefore they were not included in this dataset.

Each line in the border records represents a single individual, household or group that passed the border. The fields in this dataset are as follows:

Field name Field description
bord_id A unique identifier for this border record.
pcode As in the geographic lists; this is the village and municipality of residence reported to the border guards by the group or individual crossing the border. The value -1000 signifies that this information is missing.
exdate Date crossing the border
numpers Number of people in this party. This variable has an enormous range – in less than 2% of the records, there are more than 100 people tallied in numpers. However, these few records account for approximately 21% of the people who crossed the border. This phenomenon is discussed in Policy or Panic as “overflow;” see pp. 38-41.

Alternative border counts

Starting on 27 March 1999, the UN High Comission for Refugees issued daily situation reports in which the daily number of people crossing the border were reported. Beginning on 13 April, the Government of Albania’s Emergency Management Group began reporting figures as well. The figures do not always agree with the border data (see Graph A1, p 39 in Policy or Panic for a discussion). When the UN and EMG figures disagree with each other, it seems to be because one counts crossings in slightly different periods than the other. Summed over short periods, the two series tend to agree. The data are in alt_cnts-border.csv.

Field name Field description
exdate Date crossing the border
uncnt Number of people crossing the border reported by UNHCR
emgcnt Number of people crossing the border reported by EMG

Surveys

More information about AAAS’s survey activities in Kosovo is available here.

IPLS/AAAS – Listing

The IPLS/AAAS team registered a sample of 1837 Kosovar Albanian families residing in 18 camps in Albania. The data are in ipls-list.csv.

Field name Field description
ipls_id Unique id
numpers Number of people in this household
exdate Date crossing the border
pcode Code of the village or town where they lived in Kosovo

IPLS/AAAS – Interviews

The IPLS/AAAS team and another team from the University of California-Berkeley interviewed a total of 265 Kosovar Albanian households in camps in Albania and Bosnia; the data are in the file ipls-int.csv.

Field name Field description
pcode Code of the village or town where they lived in Kosovo
lvdate Date this household left their homes
exdate Date crossing the border
ngrp Number of people in the group
bos 1=interviewed in Bosnia; 0=interviewed in Albania

Physicians for Human Rights

In this dataset, there are 671 households that crossed into Albania and 509 more that crossed into Macedonia; these records are found in phr-transit.csv. Only their home municipalities, home leaving dates, and exiting Kosovo dates are of interest to this study. Missing values are represented by empty spaces in the comma-separated records.

Field name Field description
ngrp Number of people in the interviewed household
lvdate Date this household left their homes
exdate Date crossing the border
mcode Code of the municipality where they lived in Kosovo
id Unique id
int_loc 1=Albania, 2=Macedonia

Human Rights Watch

In this dataset, there are 123 people interviewed in AlbaniaOnly their home municipalities, home leaving dates, and exiting Kosovo dates are of interest to this study. Missing values are represented by empty spaces in the comma-separated records. The data are in hrw-transit.csv.

Field name Field description
ngrp Number of people in the interviewed household
lvdate Date this household left their homes
exdate Date crossing the border
mcode Code of the municipality where they lived in Kosovo

Estimates

The final estimates are found in migration-est.csv. Note that the methods used to estimate lvcnt in this file are described in some detail in Appendix A, Policy or Panic.

Field name Field description
pcode Code of the village or town in Kosovo
lvcnt Estimated number of people leaving home
kSE Estimated standard error of lvcnt
lvdt2 Two-day period covered by lvcnt

Last updated: 1 November 2002

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